Saturday, December 29, 2012

Dog Allergy Solutions

Skin allergies are one of most frustrating and most common reasons people bring their dogs to the vet. They are also very difficult to treat.

We get many questions at All About Labradors in regards to skin allergies and try to help as much as we can. As well, we post information we believe might be of help.

In the following two videos, Dr Bruce Syme, founder of Vets All Natural, discusses skin allergies. He explains the different types of allergies (inhaled/topic, contact, food) and how to treat allergies through diet.




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Friday, December 21, 2012

Free Bag of Hill's Science Ideal Balance Treats

Hill's Pet Nutrition is offering to help you give the gift of 100% all natural treats this year, by giving their lucky fans a Free Bag of Hill's Science Ideal Balance Treats, made right here in the USA.


Disclosure: This post contains affiliate link(s), which may result in compensation for AllAboutLabradors.blogspot.com. For more information about All About Labradors please read our Disclaimer and Disclosure Policies. We've shared this information to inform you of your option to either use our affiliated links or to go directly to the site of interest.

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Wednesday, December 19, 2012

How to Heal Your Pet's Food Allergy

Today I want to discuss novel protein diets, because a lot of dogs and cats these days have food allergies.



In addition to chronic or intermittent GI disturbances like vomiting, diarrhea and loose stools, often food allergies show up as skin problems.

So itchy rashes, hot spots, bald spots, inflamed skin, and even recurrent ear infections can all be symptoms of food allergies.

There are many additives in commercial pet food that can cause allergic reactions, but most often your dog or cat will develop sensitivity to one of the main ingredients in the food you're feeding – usually a protein or carbohydrate.

Triggers for Food Intolerance

There are many theories as to why pets develop food allergies, and there's probably some truth to all of them.

We know allergies are the result of an immune system overreaction which only develops after repeated exposure to potential allergens.

Many people believe the whole thing started with the "never switch your pet's food" directive CEOs of major pet food companies began promoting 50 or so years ago as a way to gain brand loyalty.

Certainly feeding your pet the same food every day, year after year, for many years will increase the chances of your animal reacting to a component in the food.

However, there are other factors to consider as well.

The vast majority of pet foods contain fillers like potatoes, grains, and other starches and fibers to help reduce the volume of meat that's added to the food.

This makes pet food more economical to produce.

But these fillers aren't biologically appropriate for cats and dogs.

Over time they create stress on the immune system, which in turn can develop a hypersensitivity to them.

This is what leads to an allergic response.

Emulsifiers, flavor enhancers, dyes, and preservatives, not to mention the hormones and chemicals passed up the food chain in the meat found in pet foods, can also trigger food intolerances.

Food intolerances can escalate to systemic allergic reactions.

Last but not least, the quality of ingredients is important.

Feeding rendered, low quality sources of protein – for example, hooves, feathers, or beaks – has the potential to initiate an allergic reaction in your pet.

We also know that very common allergenic ingredients contained in many popular commercial pet foods – such as corn, wheat, rice, soy, eggs, milk, yeast, potato, and beets -- are also potential culprits. Many pets react to certain animal proteins as well.

How Food Allergies Develop in Your Pet

You might be wondering how food allergies actually develop. Here's what happens.

In a healthy body, the food that is eaten will be broken down into single amino acids and nutrients which pass from the GI tract into the bloodstream, where the body can make good use of them.

The GI tract is a semi-permeable barrier that is designed to thoroughly absorb nutrients that have been totally digested but keep out partially digested nutrients, as well as other indigestible things pets eat. As you know, dogs eat rocks, sticks, tree bark, poop – all kinds of strange things.

The GI tract plays a very important role in keeping out allergens and allowing in nutrients. If partially digested foods pass through the GI wall and into the bloodstream, the immune system will mount a massive allergic reaction triggered by these foreign invaders.

These pets all have dysbiosis – that's the medical term. The layman's term is leaky gut. All of these animals will have the same immune system response every time they eat the food they have become sensitive to. That response is what results in symptoms of chronic allergies.

Introducing Novel Proteins and Carbs

Regardless of why the allergic response is occurring, both traditional and holistic vets recognize the animal's body needs a break from the food he's been eating. An allergic pet's immune system needs a chance to simmer down, which usually results in a reduction in symptoms.

Integrative veterinarians like me use the concept of a novel or new protein diet as the first step in healing a pet's leaky gut. Traditional vets usually call it a food allergy elimination trial or a 'hypoallergenic' diet. But keep in mind there's no such thing as a true hypoallergenic diet, because any animal can react to any food at any time.

What these diets do is give your pet's immune system a break from its battle against foreign invaders, and the way it's done is to transition to a different food containing ingredients your dog's or cat's body isn't familiar with.

As an example, if your dog has been fed a beef and rice-based food for the last three years, we would slowly transition her to a kangaroo and potato-based food. Or … if your kitty has been eating a fish-based diet and has developed an allergic condition, we might transition him to a diet containing a protein source like rabbit, which is novel for most pets.

It's very important that both the primary carbohydrate and protein sources be identified in your pet's current food so you can select a different food without those ingredients.

I've found it ineffective to switch just one or the other (either the carb or the protein). Transitioning from a chicken and rice-based food to a chicken and potato-based food will not, in my experience, make much difference. Both the protein AND the carbohydrate need to be replaced with novel ingredients.

In addition to switching the carb and protein sources, keep in mind the fewer grains and fillers fed, the less opportunity for allergic reactions and inflammatory conditions.

Allergic pets need to be on a single or novel protein source for a minimum of two months. I actually recommend three months for my Natural Pet patients, to allow the body time to clear out the allergenic substances and begin the detoxification process.

This is also the time when integrative vets will address a pet's dysbiosis with appropriate probiotics and nutraceuticals. This is the key to fully addressing the root of food allergies, as without this step it's only a matter of time before the cycle begins again and the hypoallergenic diet becomes hyper-allergenic.

Because each case of dysbiosis is unique and the variables causing each animal's reactions are different, a custom formulated protocol should be designed by your pet's wellness practitioner.

What Happens After the Elimination Diet?

At the end of an elimination food trial, foods are typically reintroduced slowly, one at a time, and the animal's response is closely monitored. But if a pet has had dramatic improvement on a new diet, I often don't push the reintroduction of food that could be problematic.

Many traditional vets recommend simply staying on the new food that minimized a pet's allergic symptoms until the pet develops allergies to the new diet, at which time the vet will begin searching for another 'hypoallergenic' option.

I do not typically recommend this approach, having seen too many pets run out of novel food options. I encourage pet owners to find at least one and preferably two other protein sources that their pet can also tolerate so that every three to six months, they can rotate proteins and hopefully avoid further allergic reactions.

A pet that has had an allergic response to one protein source is more likely to develop sensitivity to the replacement protein over time. That's why rotation and variety is important. Sometimes pets are able to tolerate a previously problematic food once their bodies detoxify and their GI tracts are healed and functioning normally again. This is especially true when 'clean' proteins are introduced.

Clean proteins are foods that are non-toxic, for example, fish that has not been exposed to mercury. Animals raised on a natural diet, like grass-fed rather than feedlot animals, as well as hormone-free animals, are better food sources for sensitive pets.

During and after a novel diet, I recommend natural supplements to aid detoxification, relieve allergic symptoms, and support your pet's immune system. Your holistic veterinarian can help you select the supplements most appropriate for your pet's individual needs.

Which Proteins Are Novel These Days?

So what, exactly, are novel proteins?

These are meat sources that your pet hasn't consumed before. Lamb used to be the novel protein choice used for most elimination diets, because pet food companies didn't use lamb in their formulas. But through the 1970s and 1980s, lamb became a popular commercial protein source. People overfed it. It's really no longer considered a dependable novel protein to use in an elimination diet.

Today, most vets agree novel proteins include ostrich, beaver, quail, pheasant, rabbit, venison, bison, goat, duck, elk, alligator, and kangaroo.

Switching food families is sometimes necessary because a pet that is allergic to chicken can actually be allergic to all fowl, even duck. For instance, if your cat has eaten primarily chicken as a protein source, you're better off switching to a mammal protein rather than another fowl protein source.

And remember -- any treats you give your dog or cat must also come from that same new protein. A single allergenic treat given in the middle of an elimination diet can be enough to cause a terrible flare-up of allergic symptoms.

As an integrative veterinarian, my preference is to offer a metabolically low-stress diet during this time. That means foods with no grains or starches. Many of my patients actually have terrible concurrent allergic issues such as yeast and staph infections that are exacerbated by the addition of unnecessary carbohydrates.

Many traditional veterinarians totally disregard the high amount of carbohydrates in most commercially available hypoallergenic foods, choosing to address skin infections with antibiotics and antifungal drugs instead. To each his own, but that's certainly not my preference.

Hydrolyzed Proteins

Another common recommendation by traditional vets is to feed a hydrolyzed protein diet. These diets are supposedly an alternative to novel protein diets, but I don't recommend them for a number of reasons.

A hydrolyzed protein diet contains a single regular protein, let's say chicken, which is a common allergenic food. Hydrolysis breaks down the chicken into particles so small that, according to the research, the protein is no longer recognized by the immune system as an allergen. The benefit, it would seem, is you can still feed your pet food she's allergic to, but the protein molecules have been processed in such a way that they trick the immune system.

I really don't see the point in this approach. First of all, the animal's body is not actually being returned to health. It's only being tricked into not responding to the food it has grown allergic to, assuming the hydrolyzed protein behaves as advertised.

Secondly, the methods and chemicals used in the hydrolysis process don't convert the protein into amino acids in the same natural way your pet's body does. And really, no one knows the long-term side effects that these unnaturally derived substances might have on the health of dogs and cats.

Soy is also commonly used as a protein source in these hydrolyzed diets. Soy, which is a common allergen for pets, is a poor quality source of protein, in my opinion. It's totally biologically inappropriate for dogs and cats. On top of that, it's estrogenic, which means it can eventually wreak havoc in your dog's endocrine system.

Preventing Food Allergies in Your Pet

Obviously, preventing food allergies from occurring in the first place is the primary goal in my practice.

In my opinion, the very best way to prevent food allergies in your pet is to feed a balanced, species-appropriate diet. I recommend raw food. You can either make food at home, or you can buy a commercially prepared raw food diet. Whichever way you go, I also recommend strictly limiting or at least reducing the amount of grains and carbohydrates in your pet's diet.

Rotate through three or four protein sources in your pet's diet. It provides your cat or dog with a broad nutritional base and reduces the risk of food sensitivities by providing lots of variety.

Keep in mind that it's an increasing trend among pet food manufacturers to use uncommon or exotic meats in their formulas, often combined with a conventional protein like beef or chicken.

Now, at first glance you may think this is wonderful. However, what happens is, the more exotic proteins introduced to your pet's diet, the more difficult it will be to find a novel protein diet should the need arise.

Really, I think it's better to rotate a single protein – let's say, for three to four months at a time – versus feeding multiple proteins every day. If you need to create a novel diet at some point because your pet has developed a food allergy, it could be difficult to do if you have fed every protein that's currently available on the market.

How to Heal Your Pet's Food Allergy by Dr. Karen Becker:

Dr. Karen Becker is a proactive and integrative wellness veterinarian. You can visit her site at: MercolaHealthyPets.com.

Her goal is to help you create wellness in order to prevent illness in the lives of your pets. This proactive approach seeks to save you and your pet from unnecessary stress and suffering by identifying and removing health obstacles even before disease occurs. Unfortunately, most veterinarians in the United States are trained to be reactive. They wait for symptoms to occur, and often treat those symptoms without addressing the root cause.

By reading Dr. Becker's information, you'll learn how to make impactful, consistent lifestyle choices to improve your pet's quality of life.


Disclosure: This post contains affiliate link(s), which may result in compensation for AllAboutLabradors.blogspot.com. For more information about All About Labradors please read our Disclaimer and Disclosure Policies. We've shared this information to inform you of your option to either use our affiliated links or to go directly to the site of interest.

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Friday, December 14, 2012

FREE $5 in Petco Reward Dollars

Play the Petco Pals Rewards Push game and then enter your pals rewards number to get your FREE $5 in Petco Reward Dollars .

The more points that you get in cart then the higher your reward will be. Your points will be added to your account in 7 days.


Disclosure: This post contains affiliate link(s), which may result in compensation for AllAboutLabradors.blogspot.com. For more information about All About Labradors please read our Disclaimer and Disclosure Policies. We've shared this information to inform you of your option to either use our affiliated links or to go directly to the site of interest.

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Monday, December 10, 2012

Labrador Retriever Comprehensive Guide

For those of you that are wondering if a Labrador Retriever is the right dog for you, the below listed Labrador Retriever Comprehensive Guide will be a big help in answering many questions you may have.

Some of the topics inside of the Labrador Retriever Comprehensive Guide include:

Labrador Retriever Overview

Are you a Labrador Retriever person?

Training Overview: The Labrador Retriever Puppy

Training the Labrador Retriever Puppy

Games to Play With Your Labrador Retriever Puppy

Doggie Daycare

What Are Labrador Health Issues?

Expert Advice on Labrador Retrievers

Feeding the Companion

Labrador Retriever Comprehensive Guide PDF

Click on the arrow in the top right corner to open the Labrador Retriever Comprehensive Guide in another window, making it easier to read.

Labrador Retriever Reading:

  1. The Everything Labrador Retriever Book: A Complete Guide to Raising, Training, and Caring for Your Lab (Everything (Pets))The Everything Labrador Retriever Book
  2. Labrador Retriever Training: Breed Specific Puppy Training Techniques, Potty Training, Discipline, and Care GuideLabrador Retriever Training: Breed Specific Puppy Training Techniques, Potty Training, Discipline, and Care Guide
  3. The Labrador RetrieverThe Labrador Retriever
  4. The Labrador Retriever Handbook (Barron's Pet Handbooks)The Labrador Retriever Handbook
  5. Labrador Retrievers (Barron's Complete Pet Owner's Manuals)Labrador Retrievers

Disclosure: This post contains affiliate link(s), which may result in compensation for AllAboutLabradors.blogspot.com. For more information about All About Labradors please read our Disclaimer and Disclosure Policies. We've shared this information to inform you of your option to either use our affiliated links or to go directly to the site of interest.

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Sunday, December 02, 2012

One Way To Protect Your Dog From Allergies Is To Delete Wheat From His Dog Food

Here is a big news flash, and I bet you never gave it a thought. The absence of Wheat in your Dog's food, can help him in many ways. By eliminating wheat from his diet, helps your best friend from contracting many allergies. These allergies can affect his health in many ways, including but not limited to degestive disorders.

There are many other areas of your dogs nutrition that also suffer from feeding him dog food containing wheat.

As humans we have always been told to eat wheat in our diet. Whole wheat is far different that the wheat used in your dogs food.

There are a host of ingredients added to your dogs food. These contain wheat gluten, proteins, toxic fillers, non nutritional additives and fillers for bulking the food.

Is there such a thing as wheat free dog food? Sure there is. But it is harder to find and usually less common to find. Why? Because the major pet food manufacturers, don't care as much about your pets health, as they do about profit. This certainly includes puppies and adult dogs.

Some dogs are actually very allergic to wheat and wheat fillers. I am not sure, that in today's day and age, that public demand for a greater diet or that greater restrictions be implemented by the manufacturers will in fact change anything. I say this, because it's the bottom line profit that will dictate ingredients, fillers, non nutritional proteins and the like that the manufacturer will use. Some of the major brands, and the higher end dog foods, have already begun implementing just such measures.

How do you know which ones have responded, and to what degree? It’s really quite simple, and not as difficult as you may think. If you would like to know how to get past all the smoking mirrors, advertising hype, bloated advertising budgets, and who really does have your dog's best interest and health in mind, read my resource box attached to this article. It will direct you to where you can find these answers and many, many more. This is critical, it's not just a wheat free dog food that you want to find, but how to analyze everything that is being used in your dog's food.

After you have used the tools on my website, you will know what you want and need for your dog. If you can't find it in your local stores, or if you live in a small rural town, don't worry. There are plenty of resources to use, the Internet is one of course, and they will ship directly to your door. In most cases, it will not cost that much more, as most offer free shipping.

By doing what I am saying, you will in most all cases, insulate your dog from the melamine catastrophe that was killing so many dogs in the dog food recall of a few years ago. The only way you can truly see to it that your dog is getting safe, nutritional and very healthy dog food, that will give him/her all the nutrition per serving they need, and be complying with the highest health standards is to become involved. Remember, your veterinarian is also in the business of making money, so again, it is back to you.

Don't despair, the task before you is really quite a simple one indeed. If you are armed with the free tools at my site, then trust me, your job will be a very easy one.

Now just go out and do it, your dog deserves nothing less, your vet bills will be less, your dog will be healthier and live much longer, and you too, will be much happier.

More Information:

My name is Derick Senatore. I am your consumer advocate. A person who is your spokesperson & watchdog. Independent and always monitoring your best interests as it pertains to products or services. Trust your consumer advocate. To learn more visit me at Your Dog Food Authority, for many more interesting articles and a host of free tools available for your download.



Disclosure: This post contains affiliate link(s), which may result in compensation for AllAboutLabradors.blogspot.com. For more information about All About Labradors please read our Disclaimer and Disclosure Policies. We've shared this information to inform you of your option to either use our affiliated links or to go directly to the site of interest.

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Tuesday, November 27, 2012

Free Honest Kitchen Pet Food Sample Voucher at Honest Kitchen Resellers

The Honest Kitchen is offering a Free Pet Food sample to give you a chance to try their products.

"The Honest Kitchen provides natural human-grade pet food products for dogs and cats. Our gourmet recipes are 100% natural and gently dehydrated, not extruded."

To request your Free Honest Kitchen Pet Food Sample Voucher , "Like" their Facebook page, fill in the form and they will e-mail you the voucher. Redeem the voucher to your local Honest Kitchen Reseller to claim your Free Pet Food Sample.

Find your local Honest Kitchen Resellers location.

Disclosure: This post contains affiliate link(s), which may result in compensation for AllAboutLabradors.blogspot.com. For more information about All About Labradors please read our Disclaimer and Disclosure Policies. We've shared this information to inform you of your option to either use our affiliated links or to go directly to the site of interest.

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Free 10oz tub of Beneful Prepared Meals at Petco

Print out the listed coupon and visit your local Petco to get your Free 10oz tub of Beneful Prepared Meals. Coupon expires 12/31/12.

To use the coupon you must be a member of Petco Pals and present coupon with your PALS card (sign up for Free).

Reminder: The coupon for Free Natural Balance Dog Stew is still available and expires 11/30/12.

Disclosure: This post contains affiliate link(s), which may result in compensation for AllAboutLabradors.blogspot.com. For more information about All About Labradors please read our Disclaimer and Disclosure Policies. We've shared this information to inform you of your option to either use our affiliated links or to go directly to the site of interest.

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Beneful Tuscan Style Medley - Free sample

Over at the Beneful Facebook page, you can score a Free sample of their new Beneful Tuscan Style Medley.

Beneful Tuscan Style Medley is not available in stores yet, but you can score one of the 100,000 samples that are available.


Disclosure: This post contains affiliate link(s), which may result in compensation for AllAboutLabradors.blogspot.com. For more information about All About Labradors please read our Disclaimer and Disclosure Policies. We've shared this information to inform you of your option to either use our affiliated links or to go directly to the site of interest.

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Friday, November 16, 2012

Why Does My Dog Eat Poop? By Dr Ellen Schmidt

Dogs are one of our most favorite companion animals and we love them lots. So most of their owners see poop eating by their dogs as a rather disgusting problem they want to get rid of sooner than later.

Why would dogs actually ingest faeces?

Coprophagia, the medical term for eating faeces is a quite common canine behavior. It is also a known behavior in other animal species and dogs usually ingest faeces from other carnivores or herbivores.

Ingestion of faeces is seen as totally normal for bitches with a litter of newborn puppies, when keeping them and the whelping box clean and hygienic by licking her puppies excrements away and to help them to develop regular motions and urinating. Young puppies may start to investigate and eat poop when they get more active outside the whelping box area.

Ingestion of poop is unnormal in that moment where a dog suffers form a medical problem that keeps your companion hungry and searching for food all the time. Conditions that can cause this problems are usually metabolic disorders or malabsorption. The theory about deficits of vitamins or macro nutrients is not well supported by studies yet.

Behavioral problems are here a more common reason: Most dogs that try to eat their own poop or that of other canines and other animal species cause their owners to be rather disgusted by it. Usually what happens is that you'd try to stop this behavior, which turns for your dog easily into a "game" with rules we don't really know.

What should you as a pet owner do, what should you avoid?

Catch your dog in that moment and don't start to make a big event out of it. Better is to try to get your dog to play with some of her favorite toys, which will help to distract her from this kind of behavior.

You will agree that a dog showing the "eating poop behavior" will always appear to be fairly disgusting, but depending on how gross you find this personally, it is certainly not an abnormal behavior pattern as such. Certainly, it is not a healthy behavior either and will expose your dog to a greater risk of ingesting different forms of harmful parasites that contaminate faeces of domesticated and wild carnivore animals.

Where should you get help from to get this behavior better under control?

A good idea is to consult your veterinarian first to rule out any underlying disease that could be the cause for being hungry all the time. Behavior modification may work well, so if the problem is still persistent and everything else excluded you could ask for advice from an animal behaviorist.

If you find the article about dogs who eat poop interesting and helpful, you may also be interested in further reading on Dr Ellen's website http://www.Pet-Health-Pro.com , where you can find further interesting topics about pet health, veterinary medicine and veterinary acupuncture.


Disclosure: This post contains affiliate link(s), which may result in compensation for AllAboutLabradors.blogspot.com. For more information about All About Labradors please read our Disclaimer and Disclosure Policies. We've shared this information to inform you of your option to either use our affiliated links or to go directly to the site of interest.

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Tuesday, November 13, 2012

The Most Common Health Issues with Labrador Retrievers

There are many daily blogs by Labrador Retriever owners whose pets are affected by a variety of health issues. Of these issues, two are the most prominent. Those would be musculoskeletal issues such as hip dysplasia, ACL injuries, arthritis, etc, and, skin problems often considered as "allergies".

Musculoskeletal Health

Labrador Retrievers are very popular. Their personality can range from a goofy side-kick to a very stoic companion. Many service and therapy dogs are from this breed. As their name implies, this breed was born to fetch. Ask any tennis ball, and they will tell you. Labs are right at home around the water or the field, making them very popular with hunters.

From the description above, you can tell this is a physically active breed. All of this activity can cause wear and tear on the joints. Also, popular breeds like this tend to be over-bred, often by less than reputable breeders looking to cash in on their popularity. This scenario has led to some genetic pre-dispositions, like hip dysplasia. When you couple all of this physical activity with potential for genetic defects, you have a recipe for joint/mobility problems.

How Natural Pet Supplements can help your Labrador Retriever with joint related issues

In recent years more and more people are looking for natural solutions for their pets' mobility problems. There are several all-natural products on the market, including Antioxidant Treats and/or Sprouted Granules, that offer the answers that pet owners are looking for. Obviously, no nutritional supplement is not going to reshape a dysplastic hip, or re-attach a torn ACL, or undo the ravages of arthritis; but there is a scientific reason these products have helped pets with these conditions.

The 'Live Food Enzymes' contained in these products provide resources to the body for the production of Antioxidant Enzymes. These enzymes; i.e. Superoxide Dismutase, Catalase, and Glutithione Peroxidase, are the natural agents involved in cleansing toxins from every cell in the body. As the cells are less encumbered by toxic build-up, they are more efficient at performing their tasks. This in turn affects recovery time after injury, the processes of inflammation, restoring of synovial fluid (joint lubricant), and in greater release of energy. As a result, many dogs not only resume a normal range of motion, but also show greater activity.

"Allergy" troubles

Labrador Retrievers are not the only breed to have troubles in this area, but many are afflicted all the same. Symptoms of itching, biting, scratching, chewing, hair loss, odor, blackening skin, elephant skin, weeping sores, chewing paws, ear infections, eye infections, UTI's or more can all be a part of this issue. Vets often address these problems by administering antibiotics and steroids to help calm the surface symptoms. Even though this approach often works in the short term, as soon as these medications wear off, the symptoms will often return with a vengeance.

Did you ever wonder why? Could it be that these issues are not caused by allergies at all? Did you ever consider that the Antibiotics, though killing off bad bacteria on the surface were at the same time killing off friendly bacteria in the GI tract? Did you ever consider that the steroid's deadening of the immune system, lowering inflammation, also lowers the body's ability to fight infection?

What has been described above is the perfect scenario for a Systemic Yeast Infection. What is that, exactly? It is a condition brought about by the diminishing of the good, friendly bacteria found in the GI tract allowing for the expansion of fungal yeast (already present), creating an imbalance. As the yeast expands and grows, it puts out toxic by-products that leach into the bloodstream and are carried to the extremities to be filtered out at the surface.

You might be asking how your dog got this way to start with. There are many contributing factors, including the folowwing:

1. Pet foods and snacks. Many of your big name brands are loaded with preservatives, additives and artificial colorings. These all have a negative impact on the friendly bacterial flora. At the same time, these foods are grain-based instead of meat based. Since yeast loves starch, this is a recipe for disaster.

2. Over vaccination. We are led to believe that vaccines are good for us, and that they are protecting us from harm, but often that is not the case. When we hear of a young dog with this problem, we can almost always trace the origins to the time of vaccination. This is not to say that a dog should not ever receive vaccines, but certainly not a 3-in-1 or a 5-in-1 shot. This can cause tremendous insult to the immune system, creating massive die-off of good bacteria.

3. Flea treatments and heartworm medications. Even though these products are usually effective against these critters, they are a poison, and can even contribute to neurological issues. We suggest finding natural alternatives where possible.

4. Chlorinated water. They put chlorine in the water to kill bacteria. We recommend filtered water for your pet.

5. Antibiotics. This goes without saying. There are many instances where antibiotics are necessary. If so, it is paramount that you supplement with a probiotic to help lessen the damage to good bacteria.

If your dog does have an SYI, what can you do to reverse it? That is a good question, and thankfully there is an answer. It involves a comprehensive approach designed to kill off the overgrowth of yeast, support the body for healing, repair and detoxification, and rebuild the good bacteria. The rest is a matter of time. This is NOT a quick-fix. It can take some months to get things turned around, but you can take comfort in knowing that you are getting to the ROOT of the problem, not just patching things up. For more information on these and other issues pertaining to Labrador Retrievers, please search for Antioxidant Treats and/or Sprouted Granules. You will find that these all-natural products are quite helpful.

Article submitted by Tim Delaney, a multiple dog-owner who is an animal advocate. References include Nzymes, and Nzymes EU.


Disclosure: This post contains affiliate link(s), which may result in compensation for AllAboutLabradors.blogspot.com. For more information about All About Labradors please read our Disclaimer and Disclosure Policies. We've shared this information to inform you of your option to either use our affiliated links or to go directly to the site of interest.

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Monday, November 12, 2012

Free Dog Treat Coupon Booklet and Gift Tag

Click on the "Get a free value Booklet" button on the right side of their page (see image).


You'll get a Free Dog Treat Coupon Booklet featuring savings on Milk-Bone®, Pup-Peroni®, and Milo’s Kitchen® dog snacks, plus a free gift tag for your dog (You might have to refrsh the page to see the image).


Disclosure: This post contains affiliate link(s), which may result in compensation for AllAboutLabradors.blogspot.com. For more information about All About Labradors please read our Disclaimer and Disclosure Policies. We've shared this information to inform you of your option to either use our affiliated links or to go directly to the site of interest.

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Monday, November 05, 2012

Recommendations for Avoiding Toxic Pet Treats

The chicken jerky dog treat problem is several years old, has expanded to other types of pet treats, and is no closer to being solved than it was back in 2007. So it's not surprising pet owners are looking for the safest options they can find when it comes to offering treats to their dog or cat.

And there's certainly no shortage of commercial pet treats on the market today. They come in every conceivable shape, size, smell, flavor, color and texture. The challenge is finding safe, high-quality, species-appropriate treats in a sea of products claiming to be "all-natural" and "made in the U.S.A."

The following recommendations will help point you in the direction of selecting safe, wholesome treats for your furry family member.

Tip #1: Don't Overfeed Treats to Your Pet

Dog or cat treats – even very healthy ones – should not constitute more than 15 percent of your pet's daily food intake, and preferably less than 10 percent. And it's best to limit them to training and behavior rewards, as a bedtime ritual, or as a "time to get in your crate" enticement - things of that nature. Treats should be offered primarily as rewards during house training, obedience training or other similar activities, and not because the rest of the family is sitting down with a bowl of popcorn to watch a movie.

Also keep in mind that cat and dog treats are not a complete form of nutrition for your pet, and should never be substituted for balanced, species-appropriate meals. Overfeeding treats on top of daily food intake will result in an obese pet. Overfeeding treats while underfeeding balanced meals will result in a dog or cat with nutritional deficiencies.

Tip #2: Treats Should Be Sourced in the U.S. and Made in the U.S.

Legally, pet food manufacturers can make the "made in the U.S.A." claim as long as the product was assembled in this country – even if the ingredients are imported. So when you're shopping for safe treats, it's not enough that a product claims to be made in the U.S. You want to be sure all the ingredients originated here as well.

The U.S. certainly produces its own share of tainted products, but as a general rule, the contaminating agent is quickly identified and these days, immediate action is taken to remove the product from store shelves.

The chicken jerky dog treats and other treats suspected of causing illness and death in so many pets have ingredients imported from China. Despite the efforts of the FDA and independent laboratories to isolate the contaminant, nothing has been identified, and five years after the first reports of sick and dying pets, the treats are still being produced by major pet food companies and sold by major retailers. So I would certainly strongly recommend avoiding any product containing ingredients sourced from China.

That said, I have found several excellent quality treats from New Zealand and Canada. The important point is to know and trust your treat company's commitment to purity and quality control.

Tip #3: Treats Should Be High-Quality

A high-quality pet treat will not contain grains or unnecessary fillers, rendered animal by products, added sugar (sometimes hidden in ingredients like molasses and honey), chemicals, artificial preservatives, or ingredients known to be highly allergenic to pets.

These criteria rule out the vast majority of commercial pet treats on the market.

As is the case with commercially available pet foods, high-quality pet treats aren't likely to be found in big-box stores, large pet store chains, your local supermarket, or your vet's office. Your best bet shopping locally is to visit small, independent pet stores with knowledgeable staff who can answer customer questions and are competent to recommend products that make sense for individual pets.

Most excellent quality, human-grade pet food producers – typically smaller companies – also make a few types of treats. So if you're already feeding your dog or cat a high-quality commercial pet food you trust, see if the manufacturer also makes treats.

Another option is to shop online, especially if you've done your research and know exactly what you're looking for.

Tip #4: Offer Fresh Human Foods as Treats

I recommend avoiding all grain-based treats. Your dog or cat has no biological requirements for the carbs in these treats, and in addition, they are pro-inflammatory.

Consider instead living "human" foods. Berries are a great treat because they're small and loaded with antioxidants. You can also offer small amounts – no more than 1/8 inch square for a cat or small dog and a 1/4 inch square for bigger dogs – of other fruits (melons and apples are good fruits to start with) as well as cheese.

Many cats enjoy bits of zucchini or cantaloupe. You can also try offering some dark, green leafy veggies as treats for your kitty. It might even keep her away from your houseplants!

Excellent training treats for dogs include frozen peas and raw almonds, cashews and Brazil nuts (but NEVER macadamia nuts).

Tip #5: Prepare Homemade Treats for your Pet

If your dog happens to be wild for dehydrated chicken strips (chicken jerky), you can make your own quite easily.

Just buy some boneless chicken breasts, clean them, and slice into long, thin strips – the thinner the better. Place the strips on a greased or non-stick cookie sheet and bake them for at least three hours at 180 degrees. The low temp dries the chicken out slowly and the strips wind up nice and chewy.

Let the strips cool, and then store them in plastic bags or another airtight container. You can also freeze them.

If you buy commercial canned food for your dog or cat, you can 'repurpose' a can for use as a supply of healthy treats.

Open a can of your pet's favorite brand, preferably something with a strong aroma, and spoon out little treat sized amounts onto a baking sheet covered with parchment paper.

Put the baking sheet into the freezer until the bite sized bits of food are frozen. Then move them to an airtight container and back into the freezer they go until you're ready to treat your pet to a treat! (Most dogs will enjoy the treats frozen, but you'll need to thaw them to a chewy consistency for kitties.)

For recipes to make pet treats at home using beef, liver and turkey, check out my article titled Nutritious, Delicious Pet Treats You Can Make in a Flash.

Recommendations for Avoiding Toxic Pet Treats By Dr. Becker.

Dr. Karen Becker is a proactive and integrative wellness veterinarian. You can visit her site at: MercolaHealthyPets.com.

Her goal is to help you create wellness in order to prevent illness in the lives of your pets. This proactive approach seeks to save you and your pet from unnecessary stress and suffering by identifying and removing health obstacles even before disease occurs. Unfortunately, most veterinarians in the United States are trained to be reactive. They wait for symptoms to occur, and often treat those symptoms without addressing the root cause.

By reading Dr. Becker's information, you'll learn how to make impactful, consistent lifestyle choices to improve your pet's quality of life.

Disclosure: This post contains affiliate link(s), which may result in compensation for AllAboutLabradors.blogspot.com. For more information about All About Labradors please read our Disclaimer and Disclosure Policies. We've shared this information to inform you of your option to either use our affiliated links or to go directly to the site of interest.

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Friday, October 26, 2012

Free Tails Pet Supplement Samples

Tails Pet Supplements is offering four free supplement samples for your Labrador Retriever.

The Free Tails Pet Supplement Samples offer includes:

Hip Hip Hooray - "A unique combination of collagen-building proteins, antioxidants, and Omega 3 fatty acids specifically formulated to help support joint health in dogs of all breeds and sizes. Provides the essential nutrients to help support your dog’s active lifestyle."

Grow Dog Grow - "A complete blend of vitamins and minerals formulated specifically for puppies up to 1 year old. Designed to support growth and development, and boost immune, heart, and digestive function for a happy, growing puppy."

Canine Bliss - "A balanced blend of vitamins and minerals specifically formulated for dogs 1 to 7 years. Packed with antioxidants, amino acids, fatty acids, digestive enzymes, and other essential nutrients to support lifelong health in your dog."

Rover the Hill - "A blend of essential nutrients and antioxidants specifically formulated for dogs over 7 years. Supports immune, heart, brain, and digestive function to keep mature dogs healthier and more active."

Visit their website to learn more about their products and request your free samples.


Disclosure: This post contains affiliate link(s), which may result in compensation for AllAboutLabradors.blogspot.com. For more information about All About Labradors please read our Disclaimer and Disclosure Policies. We've shared this information to inform you of your option to either use our affiliated links or to go directly to the site of interest.

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Thursday, October 25, 2012

Dogs LOVE Pegetables Video Contest

Pegetables is giving you the chance to win a year supply of their premium dental dog chews in their Dogs LOVE Pegetables Video Contest.


Pegetables are premium dental dog chews made with natural vegetables - carrot, corn and celery. Pegetables are enriched with antioxidants, complex carbohydrates, omega fatty acids, amino acids, protein, fiber, vitamins and minerals. Pegetables are clinically proven to significantly reduce plaque and tartar build-up in dogs, which results in fresher breath!

To enter the Dogs LOVE Pegetables Video Contest, just create a short video of your dog and mention Pegetables dog chews.

The winner will receive ONE YEAR'S SUPPLY of Pegetables! ($500 value) Contest ends on November 30, 2012.

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Wednesday, October 24, 2012

Electric Pet Fencing: An Affordable Way to Keep Your Pets Safe

The outside world can pose a myriad of dangers to our pets, from cars and aggressive animals to toxic food and harsh weather. Many animals who escape from their homes end up in shelters as strays. If they’ve lost their ID tags along the way, it is likely that they will never see their original home again. The National Council on Pet Study and Population estimates that 98% of stray cats and 80% of stray dogs never return home. If these animals are lucky, they will be adopted by a nice family, but the majority of strays do not fare so well. With so much at stake, it is imperative that pet owners ensure that their pets stay safely on their home property. Training is an essential part of the plan, but you will need to take additional precautions to prevent losing your pets.

If you own a dog, you need to fence in your yard to ensure that they remain safely on your property. However, because permanent fencing can be quite costly to erect, many dog owners neglect to do this. Electric pet fencing offers an affordable solution to contain your pets. Not only are they relatively inexpensive, they are convenient, and super easy to install. Electric pet fences offer you the flexibility to change the configuration of your fence at will, and also give you the option of removing the fence and taking it with you if you move house; saving you cost of purchasing a new fence when you move into your new abode.

Electric pet fences also have numerous other benefits: they are durable, weatherproof, and require little maintenance; pets quickly learn to respect the boundaries of the fence and stay away, consequently dogs are less likely to dig under or jump over an electric fence than a solid fence.

Above ground electric pet fences not only keep pets in, they are also effective at keeping predators and other unwanted critters out, ensuring that your pets are protected from wild animals that could cause them harm or pass on disease. They can also be used with great effect to keep pets out of sensitive areas in your garden, such as flower beds or your veggie patch, or to keep cats and other predators away from fish ponds or bird aviaries.

Electric pet fencing is available in kit form – the kits contain all the necessary equipment to enable you to quickly install an electric fence to contain your pets. Typically a kit will consist of electric fence wire, PVC fence posts, a grounding rod, and accessories such as connectors and possibly a fence tester. In addition, you will need an energizer to keep the fence charged – the type and size of the energizer will depend on how long your fence is, and the type of animals you wish to contain or exclude, but generally a small, low-powered energizer is adequate for pets. Energizers can be AC powered, battery powered, or even solar powered, allowing you complete flexibility in all situations.

Disclosure: This post contains affiliate link(s), which may result in compensation for AllAboutLabradors.blogspot.com. For more information about All About Labradors please read our Disclaimer and Disclosure Policies. We've shared this information to inform you of your option to either use our affiliated links or to go directly to the site of interest.

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Saturday, October 20, 2012

Top 5 Reasons to Own a Labrador

The Labrador Retriever is one of the most popular dogs in the United States, and also popular worldwide. The breed has many characteristics that make the Labrador a great choice for a domestic pet. Well known for their intelligence, friendly personalities and gentleness with humans, it's no wonder they are so loved by dog owners. There are many other reasons, however, to choose a Labrador Retriever. 

1. Labradors are Perfect for Kids

You can trust a trained Labrador Retriever to be good with family members. They are gentle playmates for children and will become protective of them. Labradors have lots of energy and can keep up with kids and tolerate some rough play. 

2. They are Easy to Train

Labradors should be acclimated into the family and properly trained. They are intelligent and learn the rules quickly, so house training and behavior training are quickly accomplished. They can learn tricks, rules, and can be trained to assist the disabled. They can also be trained to guard or protect people and property. 

3. Labrador as great companion

Most Labradors are loyal, and can sometimes take on the emotional state of the owner. Because of their friendly attitudes, many Labradors attach well to their owners and form a bond. They will protect their human owner if necessary. 

4. Labradors Look Good

Labradors can be beige, brown, black and mixed colors, but all of them have a beautiful coat and strong bodies. They are the common face of childhood dogs, and are successful in dog shows because of their canine beauty. 

5. Labradors are Energetic

Labs will provide many hours of playtime and exercise for any dog owner. They are strong dogs, capable of running quickly and playing hours of catch. They are adept at seeking out objects, retrieving, and have even been put to work as service dogs for search and rescue missions of for aiding the blind. 

Labrador Retrievers serve us in multiple ways, not just as pets. They become our friends and part of the family because they are a good breed to bond with humans and make a great addition to any household.

Top 5 Reasons to Own a Labrador is a guest post by Sara.

Author Bio:

Sara is an active nanny as well as an active freelance writer. She is a frequent contributor of http://www.nannypro.com/.



Disclosure: This post contains affiliate link(s), which may result in compensation for AllAboutLabradors.blogspot.com. For more information about All About Labradors please read our Disclaimer and Disclosure Policies. We've shared this information to inform you of your option to either use our affiliated links or to go directly to the site of interest.

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Saturday, October 13, 2012

Jack - 3-month-old Chocolate Labrador Retriever

The adorable photos of Jack, a 3 month old Chocolate Labrador were sent in by Ty (Australia).

"Hello, here some pics of my 3 months old Chocolate Labrador. His name is Jack. He is our baby!"





Thanks for sharing the photos of your 'Baby' Ty!


Disclosure: This post contains affiliate link(s), which may result in compensation for AllAboutLabradors.blogspot.com. For more information about All About Labradors please read our Disclaimer and Disclosure Policies. We've shared this information to inform you of your option to either use our affiliated links or to go directly to the site of interest.

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Thursday, October 11, 2012

Free Halloween Pet Bow Today 10/11 at 9:00PM EST (first 100)

My Favorite Pet Shop is offering Free Halloween Pet Bows tonight at 9:00PM EST. The first 100 people to request, will get one!


To get your Free Halloween Pet Bow:

1. Sign in with Facebook account
2. “Like” theuir page
3. Share with friends
4. Click “Get Started”


Disclosure: This post contains affiliate link(s), which may result in compensation for AllAboutLabradors.blogspot.com. For more information about All About Labradors please read our Disclaimer and Disclosure Policies. We've shared this information to inform you of your option to either use our affiliated links or to go directly to the site of interest.

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Tuesday, October 09, 2012

4 Common Skin Problems with Labrador Retrievers and How to Treat Them

Labrador Retrievers are the most popular dog by registered owners in the United States and Canada, and why not? Labradors are easy to train to play with kids, and understand commands very well. Furthermore, labs also have few health problems, except for the fact that they are susceptible to skin problems. If this sounds close to home, then here are four common skin problems with Labrador Retrievers, and how to treat them.

Flea Allergy Dermatitis

Lots of breeds become bothered by fleas, and labs are no exception. In fact, many labs are allergic to fleas, which cause serious skin irritation. Because of this, many dogs will suffer injuries by gnawing or clawing at the irritated area. Labs are not allergic to flea bites though - the problem comes from the flea saliva. this makes it difficult when it comes to treatment. There are numerous ways to treat a dog that has fleas though, so be patient. The first step most people take is to buy a flea collar and flea spray, but it doesn't work for all dogs. If that does not work, take your dog to your local vet, who can figure out how to start an effective treatment. Don't hesitate either, because though fleas bother many breeds of dogs, they bother Labs much more than the average dog.

Lick Granuloma

Lick Granuloma is one of the most frustrating conditions a pet owner will experience. The disorder is psychological, which makes treatment almost impossible. Lick Granuloma is the condition in which a dog constantly licks an area of their body, until the area becomes inflamed. In most cases, dogs lick an area near their paws. The issue can be caused by an infection, but is likely a compulsion. Unfortunately, there are few treatment options. Find out if the dog has any allergy problems and a healthy diet. If the issue is psychological, the dog needs more attention and time, and it will include some kind of negative reinforcement. Lick Granuloma is difficult to treat, but not impossible.

Hypothyroidism

Hypothyroidism is a condition in which the body does not release enough hormones - specifically of the T4 and T3 variety. This condition is more common in middle-aged dogs, especially in Labs. Symptoms of Hypothyroidism include stubborn hair growth and excessive shedding. Your dog will also likely be lethargic and constantly tired. A veterinarian can do a battery of tests to determine the cause of Hypothyroidism, and rest assured that they will prescribe the dog an effective medicine.

Mange

Parasitic mites cause mange, which bothers many breeds of dogs. These mites will embed themselves in the Labs fur, and bite the skin frequently. This is what causes the ugly patches of missing fur on dogs that could be described as "mangy". Most vets can treat the dog with a treatment every two weeks, and this should be successful within a few weeks, meaning the dog's hair will return to normal.


Disclosure: This post contains affiliate link(s), which may result in compensation for AllAboutLabradors.blogspot.com. For more information about All About Labradors please read our Disclaimer and Disclosure Policies. We've shared this information to inform you of your option to either use our affiliated links or to go directly to the site of interest.

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Thursday, October 04, 2012

Winter Weather: How to Get your Lab Ready

Anyone living in a region where winters are cold needs to develop a routine to ensure their animal's safety. Even though dogs have fur and can handle some cold, they still need to be protected too! Naturally, preparing a Labrador for the cold winter will ensure their safety and happiness. Once developed, a winter routine will be easy for anyone to follow Here are five tips to get your lab ready for the winter!!

Shelter

Do not leave a lab outside in the winter without shelter. The cold suits some dogs, but most dogs will not enjoy the harsh winter weather. Indoor shelter can include the garage or the house - a dog house will not suffice. If, for some reason, your dog has to live outdoors, it will need a dog house with a heated bed. If a lab does not have adequate shelter during the winter, they will be uncomfortable and put in danger.

Feet

Do not overlook the feet! Consider foot protection booties even. This is especially valuable in icy areas. Not only will booties protect a lab's feet, they will also provide better grip, which will help prevent falls. For a lab to be comfortable, keeping their feet warm needs to be a priority. Keep in mind, some labs will not tolerate foot booties, and find a way to take them off.

Checking In

If a Labrador is outside for a few hours, or even in the garage, make sure the dog is okay. In cold weather, a dog can start to get sick or uncomfortable in a matter of minutes. If a lab becomes agitated by the cold, they will start barking desperately or shivering. Make sure to keep an eye out on the dog for any signs of frostbite and freezing.

Safety

During the winter, a dog needs to be safe from more than just the weather. Antifreeze is a big killer of dogs, so make sure there are no puddles of antifreeze in the yard or garage. In the house, make sure the dog is safe near the fireplace and heaters. In regards to snow, do not allow a dog to eat snow, there could be chemicals or other dangerous substances in the snow. Remember, during the winter water can freeze. Make sure the Labrador has plenty of water, and that the water does not freeze. A Labradors safety is dependent on the owner taking the right steps.

Exercise

It is crucial for a lab to get their exercise. A lot of dog owners neglect their dog's exercise habits, but this is a huge mistake. Remember, take the lab out for walks and to play games, even on cold days. On unseasonably warm days, take the lab to a park, so the dog can play with other dogs. Dogs need exercise year round and will otherwise suffer without exercise! If you can't provide this in the winter, perhaps you shouldn't have a dog. This is generally more true for younger and larger dogs, and less true for older and smaller dogs.

Anyone with a Labrador needs to have a winter routine to ensure their dogs health and safety. Keeping Labrador safe and healthy will ensure they are happy, while the owner will avoid large vet bills.

Winter Weather: How to Get your Lab Ready is a guest post by Emily Chase.

Emily Chase writes about weather, his pets & more at www.healthinsurancequotes.org.



Disclosure: This post contains affiliate link(s), which may result in compensation for AllAboutLabradors.blogspot.com. For more information about All About Labradors please read our Disclaimer and Disclosure Policies. We've shared this information to inform you of your option to either use our affiliated links or to go directly to the site of interest.

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Monday, October 01, 2012

Free Natural Balance Dog Stew at Petco

Print out the listed coupon and visit your local Petco to get your Free Natural Balance Dog Stew. Coupon expires 11/30/12.

To use the coupon you must be a member of Petco Pals and present coupon with your PALS card (sign up for Free).

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Saturday, September 29, 2012

Allergies and your Labrador Retriever

Labrador retrievers have been one of the most popular adoption dog breeds in America for the last twenty years. This large and lovable creature makes for a companion that will keep you company, especially when you’re feeling a little under the weather.

So, what happens when your Labrador is feeling a little sneezy this fall season? Allergies are on the rise for people and dogs alike, often resulting in itchy, sneezing, and runny nose signs. We don’t always consider our companion to have such problems, but it is far more prominent than one might think.

A dog suffering from allergies show a variety of signs, such as red eyes, dry and flakey skin (dandruff), along with a runny nose. In some cases, they may even have diarrhea or vomiting issues. This could result from many causes, from food to fleas and so much more. As your dog’s owner and protector, it is your duty to be aware of what is going on in your dog’s body and the best ways to address these issues so they can get back to sniffing around without sneezing everywhere.

In the air tonight

Dust, pollen, and even the debris released during the fall season’s dropping leaves and late blooming can irritate anyone’s allergies. These can cause a dog’s eyes to turn red and their nose to run. Sneezing is commonly associated, especially if they are lying on their back waiting for a belly rub.

There are other outdoor issues, such as fleas which can also stimulate allergic reactions. Normally, the irritation would be limited to the area of a bite, in which case the best method of treatment is to keep the fleas and ticks off them in the first place.

Skin allergies are hardest to spot because of a dog’s coat. Redness and swelling may be hidden by fur, so it’s always good to inspect your dog’s skin regularly. This is especially important if they are scratching or nibbling at a specific area constantly, such as paws, hind end, or ears. But, if skin allergies persist, dietary supplements such as omega fatty acids and brewer’s yeast can help keep their skin moist and healthy to help reduce the irritation of allergic reactions.

What did I eat?

Allergic reactions are normally on the outside, but dogs can eat foods that don’t agree with them as well. Dogs are renowned for their hearty appetites and will eat indiscriminately, which means they won’t necessarily stop eating it just because they’re allergic to it. If your dog is having issues with diarrhea or is vomiting, double check their diet. This is especially true during social events where people tend to sneak a dog some human food. Foods like tomatoes and melons tend to lead to allergic reactions in dogs as well as humans. This can often lead to trouble breathing and swallowing, so be prepared to treat your dog’s reaction. In emergency cases, dog allergy medication is the best bet. These often contain diphenhydramine HCL (Benadryl). Be sure to consult with your vet to ensure proper dosage and help target the allergic reaction.

The Labrador retriever is a magnificent friend, but allergies can definitely put a damper on anyone’s day. Be sure you pay attention for any behavioral changes in your dog and address them accordingly to ensure they stay happy and healthy in their home.

Allergies and your Labrador Retriever is a guest post by Brandon Kennington

Author Bio:

Brandon Kennington is the inventor and owner of the Porch Potty – the world’s first automatic grass dog litter box. As dog owner and a busy business owner, Brandon invented the Porch Potty when he didn’t want his dog to have to wait all day to go. Porch Potty admires dog owners and also provides great tips for dog lovers on the Porch Potty Blog.


Disclosure: This post contains affiliate link(s), which may result in compensation for AllAboutLabradors.blogspot.com. For more information about All About Labradors please read our Disclaimer and Disclosure Policies. We've shared this information to inform you of your option to either use our affiliated links or to go directly to the site of interest.

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Thursday, September 27, 2012

Free Initial Pet Health Exam at VCA Animal Hospital

New clients to VCA Animal Hospitals can get a coupon good for Free Initial Pet Health Exam.

VCA Animal Hospitals operate more than 520 animal hospitals in 41 states across the nation in the VCA network. These hospitals are staffed by over 1,800 fully qualified, dedicated and compassionate veterinarians.

The Free Initial Pet Health Exam coupon is good for up to two pets (dogs or cats only) per household and redeemable only at a general practice VCA Animal Hospital.

Find your local Free Free Initial Pet Health Exam at VCA Animal Hospital locations.

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