Tuesday, November 27, 2012

Free Honest Kitchen Pet Food Sample Voucher at Honest Kitchen Resellers

The Honest Kitchen is offering a Free Pet Food sample to give you a chance to try their products.

"The Honest Kitchen provides natural human-grade pet food products for dogs and cats. Our gourmet recipes are 100% natural and gently dehydrated, not extruded."

To request your Free Honest Kitchen Pet Food Sample Voucher , "Like" their Facebook page, fill in the form and they will e-mail you the voucher. Redeem the voucher to your local Honest Kitchen Reseller to claim your Free Pet Food Sample.

Find your local Honest Kitchen Resellers location.

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Free 10oz tub of Beneful Prepared Meals at Petco

Print out the listed coupon and visit your local Petco to get your Free 10oz tub of Beneful Prepared Meals. Coupon expires 12/31/12.

To use the coupon you must be a member of Petco Pals and present coupon with your PALS card (sign up for Free).

Reminder: The coupon for Free Natural Balance Dog Stew is still available and expires 11/30/12.

Disclosure: This post contains affiliate link(s), which may result in compensation for AllAboutLabradors.blogspot.com. For more information about All About Labradors please read our Disclaimer and Disclosure Policies. We've shared this information to inform you of your option to either use our affiliated links or to go directly to the site of interest.

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Beneful Tuscan Style Medley - Free sample

Over at the Beneful Facebook page, you can score a Free sample of their new Beneful Tuscan Style Medley.

Beneful Tuscan Style Medley is not available in stores yet, but you can score one of the 100,000 samples that are available.


Disclosure: This post contains affiliate link(s), which may result in compensation for AllAboutLabradors.blogspot.com. For more information about All About Labradors please read our Disclaimer and Disclosure Policies. We've shared this information to inform you of your option to either use our affiliated links or to go directly to the site of interest.

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Friday, November 16, 2012

Why Does My Dog Eat Poop? By Dr Ellen Schmidt

Dogs are one of our most favorite companion animals and we love them lots. So most of their owners see poop eating by their dogs as a rather disgusting problem they want to get rid of sooner than later.

Why would dogs actually ingest faeces?

Coprophagia, the medical term for eating faeces is a quite common canine behavior. It is also a known behavior in other animal species and dogs usually ingest faeces from other carnivores or herbivores.

Ingestion of faeces is seen as totally normal for bitches with a litter of newborn puppies, when keeping them and the whelping box clean and hygienic by licking her puppies excrements away and to help them to develop regular motions and urinating. Young puppies may start to investigate and eat poop when they get more active outside the whelping box area.

Ingestion of poop is unnormal in that moment where a dog suffers form a medical problem that keeps your companion hungry and searching for food all the time. Conditions that can cause this problems are usually metabolic disorders or malabsorption. The theory about deficits of vitamins or macro nutrients is not well supported by studies yet.

Behavioral problems are here a more common reason: Most dogs that try to eat their own poop or that of other canines and other animal species cause their owners to be rather disgusted by it. Usually what happens is that you'd try to stop this behavior, which turns for your dog easily into a "game" with rules we don't really know.

What should you as a pet owner do, what should you avoid?

Catch your dog in that moment and don't start to make a big event out of it. Better is to try to get your dog to play with some of her favorite toys, which will help to distract her from this kind of behavior.

You will agree that a dog showing the "eating poop behavior" will always appear to be fairly disgusting, but depending on how gross you find this personally, it is certainly not an abnormal behavior pattern as such. Certainly, it is not a healthy behavior either and will expose your dog to a greater risk of ingesting different forms of harmful parasites that contaminate faeces of domesticated and wild carnivore animals.

Where should you get help from to get this behavior better under control?

A good idea is to consult your veterinarian first to rule out any underlying disease that could be the cause for being hungry all the time. Behavior modification may work well, so if the problem is still persistent and everything else excluded you could ask for advice from an animal behaviorist.

If you find the article about dogs who eat poop interesting and helpful, you may also be interested in further reading on Dr Ellen's website http://www.Pet-Health-Pro.com , where you can find further interesting topics about pet health, veterinary medicine and veterinary acupuncture.


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Tuesday, November 13, 2012

The Most Common Health Issues with Labrador Retrievers

There are many daily blogs by Labrador Retriever owners whose pets are affected by a variety of health issues. Of these issues, two are the most prominent. Those would be musculoskeletal issues such as hip dysplasia, ACL injuries, arthritis, etc, and, skin problems often considered as "allergies".

Musculoskeletal Health

Labrador Retrievers are very popular. Their personality can range from a goofy side-kick to a very stoic companion. Many service and therapy dogs are from this breed. As their name implies, this breed was born to fetch. Ask any tennis ball, and they will tell you. Labs are right at home around the water or the field, making them very popular with hunters.

From the description above, you can tell this is a physically active breed. All of this activity can cause wear and tear on the joints. Also, popular breeds like this tend to be over-bred, often by less than reputable breeders looking to cash in on their popularity. This scenario has led to some genetic pre-dispositions, like hip dysplasia. When you couple all of this physical activity with potential for genetic defects, you have a recipe for joint/mobility problems.

How Natural Pet Supplements can help your Labrador Retriever with joint related issues

In recent years more and more people are looking for natural solutions for their pets' mobility problems. There are several all-natural products on the market, including Antioxidant Treats and/or Sprouted Granules, that offer the answers that pet owners are looking for. Obviously, no nutritional supplement is not going to reshape a dysplastic hip, or re-attach a torn ACL, or undo the ravages of arthritis; but there is a scientific reason these products have helped pets with these conditions.

The 'Live Food Enzymes' contained in these products provide resources to the body for the production of Antioxidant Enzymes. These enzymes; i.e. Superoxide Dismutase, Catalase, and Glutithione Peroxidase, are the natural agents involved in cleansing toxins from every cell in the body. As the cells are less encumbered by toxic build-up, they are more efficient at performing their tasks. This in turn affects recovery time after injury, the processes of inflammation, restoring of synovial fluid (joint lubricant), and in greater release of energy. As a result, many dogs not only resume a normal range of motion, but also show greater activity.

"Allergy" troubles

Labrador Retrievers are not the only breed to have troubles in this area, but many are afflicted all the same. Symptoms of itching, biting, scratching, chewing, hair loss, odor, blackening skin, elephant skin, weeping sores, chewing paws, ear infections, eye infections, UTI's or more can all be a part of this issue. Vets often address these problems by administering antibiotics and steroids to help calm the surface symptoms. Even though this approach often works in the short term, as soon as these medications wear off, the symptoms will often return with a vengeance.

Did you ever wonder why? Could it be that these issues are not caused by allergies at all? Did you ever consider that the Antibiotics, though killing off bad bacteria on the surface were at the same time killing off friendly bacteria in the GI tract? Did you ever consider that the steroid's deadening of the immune system, lowering inflammation, also lowers the body's ability to fight infection?

What has been described above is the perfect scenario for a Systemic Yeast Infection. What is that, exactly? It is a condition brought about by the diminishing of the good, friendly bacteria found in the GI tract allowing for the expansion of fungal yeast (already present), creating an imbalance. As the yeast expands and grows, it puts out toxic by-products that leach into the bloodstream and are carried to the extremities to be filtered out at the surface.

You might be asking how your dog got this way to start with. There are many contributing factors, including the folowwing:

1. Pet foods and snacks. Many of your big name brands are loaded with preservatives, additives and artificial colorings. These all have a negative impact on the friendly bacterial flora. At the same time, these foods are grain-based instead of meat based. Since yeast loves starch, this is a recipe for disaster.

2. Over vaccination. We are led to believe that vaccines are good for us, and that they are protecting us from harm, but often that is not the case. When we hear of a young dog with this problem, we can almost always trace the origins to the time of vaccination. This is not to say that a dog should not ever receive vaccines, but certainly not a 3-in-1 or a 5-in-1 shot. This can cause tremendous insult to the immune system, creating massive die-off of good bacteria.

3. Flea treatments and heartworm medications. Even though these products are usually effective against these critters, they are a poison, and can even contribute to neurological issues. We suggest finding natural alternatives where possible.

4. Chlorinated water. They put chlorine in the water to kill bacteria. We recommend filtered water for your pet.

5. Antibiotics. This goes without saying. There are many instances where antibiotics are necessary. If so, it is paramount that you supplement with a probiotic to help lessen the damage to good bacteria.

If your dog does have an SYI, what can you do to reverse it? That is a good question, and thankfully there is an answer. It involves a comprehensive approach designed to kill off the overgrowth of yeast, support the body for healing, repair and detoxification, and rebuild the good bacteria. The rest is a matter of time. This is NOT a quick-fix. It can take some months to get things turned around, but you can take comfort in knowing that you are getting to the ROOT of the problem, not just patching things up. For more information on these and other issues pertaining to Labrador Retrievers, please search for Antioxidant Treats and/or Sprouted Granules. You will find that these all-natural products are quite helpful.

Article submitted by Tim Delaney, a multiple dog-owner who is an animal advocate. References include Nzymes, and Nzymes EU.


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Monday, November 12, 2012

Free Dog Treat Coupon Booklet and Gift Tag

Click on the "Get a free value Booklet" button on the right side of their page (see image).


You'll get a Free Dog Treat Coupon Booklet featuring savings on Milk-Bone®, Pup-Peroni®, and Milo’s Kitchen® dog snacks, plus a free gift tag for your dog (You might have to refrsh the page to see the image).


Disclosure: This post contains affiliate link(s), which may result in compensation for AllAboutLabradors.blogspot.com. For more information about All About Labradors please read our Disclaimer and Disclosure Policies. We've shared this information to inform you of your option to either use our affiliated links or to go directly to the site of interest.

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Monday, November 05, 2012

Recommendations for Avoiding Toxic Pet Treats

The chicken jerky dog treat problem is several years old, has expanded to other types of pet treats, and is no closer to being solved than it was back in 2007. So it's not surprising pet owners are looking for the safest options they can find when it comes to offering treats to their dog or cat.

And there's certainly no shortage of commercial pet treats on the market today. They come in every conceivable shape, size, smell, flavor, color and texture. The challenge is finding safe, high-quality, species-appropriate treats in a sea of products claiming to be "all-natural" and "made in the U.S.A."

The following recommendations will help point you in the direction of selecting safe, wholesome treats for your furry family member.

Tip #1: Don't Overfeed Treats to Your Pet

Dog or cat treats – even very healthy ones – should not constitute more than 15 percent of your pet's daily food intake, and preferably less than 10 percent. And it's best to limit them to training and behavior rewards, as a bedtime ritual, or as a "time to get in your crate" enticement - things of that nature. Treats should be offered primarily as rewards during house training, obedience training or other similar activities, and not because the rest of the family is sitting down with a bowl of popcorn to watch a movie.

Also keep in mind that cat and dog treats are not a complete form of nutrition for your pet, and should never be substituted for balanced, species-appropriate meals. Overfeeding treats on top of daily food intake will result in an obese pet. Overfeeding treats while underfeeding balanced meals will result in a dog or cat with nutritional deficiencies.

Tip #2: Treats Should Be Sourced in the U.S. and Made in the U.S.

Legally, pet food manufacturers can make the "made in the U.S.A." claim as long as the product was assembled in this country – even if the ingredients are imported. So when you're shopping for safe treats, it's not enough that a product claims to be made in the U.S. You want to be sure all the ingredients originated here as well.

The U.S. certainly produces its own share of tainted products, but as a general rule, the contaminating agent is quickly identified and these days, immediate action is taken to remove the product from store shelves.

The chicken jerky dog treats and other treats suspected of causing illness and death in so many pets have ingredients imported from China. Despite the efforts of the FDA and independent laboratories to isolate the contaminant, nothing has been identified, and five years after the first reports of sick and dying pets, the treats are still being produced by major pet food companies and sold by major retailers. So I would certainly strongly recommend avoiding any product containing ingredients sourced from China.

That said, I have found several excellent quality treats from New Zealand and Canada. The important point is to know and trust your treat company's commitment to purity and quality control.

Tip #3: Treats Should Be High-Quality

A high-quality pet treat will not contain grains or unnecessary fillers, rendered animal by products, added sugar (sometimes hidden in ingredients like molasses and honey), chemicals, artificial preservatives, or ingredients known to be highly allergenic to pets.

These criteria rule out the vast majority of commercial pet treats on the market.

As is the case with commercially available pet foods, high-quality pet treats aren't likely to be found in big-box stores, large pet store chains, your local supermarket, or your vet's office. Your best bet shopping locally is to visit small, independent pet stores with knowledgeable staff who can answer customer questions and are competent to recommend products that make sense for individual pets.

Most excellent quality, human-grade pet food producers – typically smaller companies – also make a few types of treats. So if you're already feeding your dog or cat a high-quality commercial pet food you trust, see if the manufacturer also makes treats.

Another option is to shop online, especially if you've done your research and know exactly what you're looking for.

Tip #4: Offer Fresh Human Foods as Treats

I recommend avoiding all grain-based treats. Your dog or cat has no biological requirements for the carbs in these treats, and in addition, they are pro-inflammatory.

Consider instead living "human" foods. Berries are a great treat because they're small and loaded with antioxidants. You can also offer small amounts – no more than 1/8 inch square for a cat or small dog and a 1/4 inch square for bigger dogs – of other fruits (melons and apples are good fruits to start with) as well as cheese.

Many cats enjoy bits of zucchini or cantaloupe. You can also try offering some dark, green leafy veggies as treats for your kitty. It might even keep her away from your houseplants!

Excellent training treats for dogs include frozen peas and raw almonds, cashews and Brazil nuts (but NEVER macadamia nuts).

Tip #5: Prepare Homemade Treats for your Pet

If your dog happens to be wild for dehydrated chicken strips (chicken jerky), you can make your own quite easily.

Just buy some boneless chicken breasts, clean them, and slice into long, thin strips – the thinner the better. Place the strips on a greased or non-stick cookie sheet and bake them for at least three hours at 180 degrees. The low temp dries the chicken out slowly and the strips wind up nice and chewy.

Let the strips cool, and then store them in plastic bags or another airtight container. You can also freeze them.

If you buy commercial canned food for your dog or cat, you can 'repurpose' a can for use as a supply of healthy treats.

Open a can of your pet's favorite brand, preferably something with a strong aroma, and spoon out little treat sized amounts onto a baking sheet covered with parchment paper.

Put the baking sheet into the freezer until the bite sized bits of food are frozen. Then move them to an airtight container and back into the freezer they go until you're ready to treat your pet to a treat! (Most dogs will enjoy the treats frozen, but you'll need to thaw them to a chewy consistency for kitties.)

For recipes to make pet treats at home using beef, liver and turkey, check out my article titled Nutritious, Delicious Pet Treats You Can Make in a Flash.

Recommendations for Avoiding Toxic Pet Treats By Dr. Becker.

Dr. Karen Becker is a proactive and integrative wellness veterinarian. You can visit her site at: MercolaHealthyPets.com.

Her goal is to help you create wellness in order to prevent illness in the lives of your pets. This proactive approach seeks to save you and your pet from unnecessary stress and suffering by identifying and removing health obstacles even before disease occurs. Unfortunately, most veterinarians in the United States are trained to be reactive. They wait for symptoms to occur, and often treat those symptoms without addressing the root cause.

By reading Dr. Becker's information, you'll learn how to make impactful, consistent lifestyle choices to improve your pet's quality of life.

Disclosure: This post contains affiliate link(s), which may result in compensation for AllAboutLabradors.blogspot.com. For more information about All About Labradors please read our Disclaimer and Disclosure Policies. We've shared this information to inform you of your option to either use our affiliated links or to go directly to the site of interest.

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